Happy Pride! We need LGBT foster carers across London

 In Becoming a Carer

lgbt foster carers

Happy Pride! We need LGBT foster carers across London

If you’re a member of the LGBT community and you’re interested in becoming a foster carer, we’d love to hear from you!

As an independent foster care agency operating across London, we get literally dozens of requests to place young people who are questioning their gender identity, sexual identity and sexual orientation.

Where possible, we would like to place these young people with foster carers who might have a similar story, because having someone to talk to who understands the journey they’re on can make a huge difference to a young person. And that’s a really wonderful thing!

If you’re from the LGBTQI community and want to become a foster carer, we’ve included some information below which hopefully you’ll find interesting and useful. You can also contact us at any time for a chat!

How does being gay, lesbian or trans factor into my ability to become a foster carer?

The first thing to know is the process is absolutely identical for every single person who applies to become a foster carer — so there’s nothing different there whatsoever.

READ MORE: How the foster care assessment process works

That said, it’s good to keep in mind that when we assess anyone’s suitability to become a foster carer we’ll be curious about you and your background and what makes you you!

So, we’ll ask what stories you have about resilience and what stories you might have around challenges in your life and how you’ve got through them. We want to know how you make sense of yourself in the world, how you think other people make sense of you, and what your values and beliefs are. That’s going to touch on your identity aspects.

diverse foster carers

We need lots of lovely, diverse foster carers because of the young people and the referrals that we’re getting.

The assessment process is designed to help us understand you as a person, and understanding your experiences and your life journey is a big part of that. There are no right or wrong answers; it’s your story. What we’re thinking about is how you might be able to use those experiences in your fostering career.

Why are you specifically looking for LGBT foster carers?

We need lots of lovely, diverse foster carers because of the young people and the referrals that we’re getting.

As mentioned above, we’re getting so many more referrals from young people who are questioning their gender or sexual identity and we would like to, if possible, place them with foster carers who they can identify with and who can help talk them through what they’re experiencing.

identify as non-binary

It’s becoming increasingly common for young people to identify as non-binary, and to not label their sexuality.

It’s also becoming increasingly common for young people to identify as non-binary (that is, they don’t identify as male or female) and to not put a label on their sexuality. This can sometimes be initially difficult for foster carers to get their head around, so if we know we’ve got a foster carer who is already quite open or quite liberal around sexual identity or gender identity, that’s very helpful for us in terms of being able to place that young person.

How does sexual identity or gender identity factor into foster placements?

The stories and experiences of the LGBT young people who are finding themselves in foster care are diverse, and not always directly related to their LGBT or questioning status.

However, obviously sometimes there is a direct correlation. For example, perhaps the young person has been left in the UK as an unaccompanied minor when their parents have returned to their country of origin, because the parents are concerned about what might happen to their young person in that country because of their sexual or gender identity.

Other young people want or need to go into foster care because they need to have a safe space to think, grow and be, and they can’t necessarily do that with their birth families.

lgbt foster parents

Some young people want or need to go into foster care because they need a safe space to think, grow and be.

For LiKa, as an independent fostering agency, having foster carers who are not only open to looking after young people who are questioning different elements of their identity but have also been through something similar means we can help some of these young people.

What training and support will I receive as a LiKa foster carer?

As a LiKa foster carer you receive extensive training and resources, tailored to your individual care situation. We want you to feel empowered as a foster carer, so we’ll also arrange any extra or specialised training you might feel you need.

Support from our team of experienced professionals, including social workers, therapists and other foster carers, is available 24/7 – including from LGBT members of our team.

Ready to transform the life of a young LGBT or questioning young person?

If you’re a member of the LGBTQI community in London and you’re interested in becoming a foster carer, give our team a call on 0208 667 2111 or email enquiries@likafamilyfostering.co.uk

LiKa recruits foster carers in the London boroughs of Croydon, Sutton, Bromley, Merton, Lambeth, Westminster, Wandsworth, Lewisham, Southwark, Islington, Camden, Hackney, Tower Hamlets, Ilford, City of London, Haringey, Newham, Redbridge, Barking and Dagenham, Hammersmith and Fulham, and Kensington and Chelsea.

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